24 June 2020Comments are off for this post.

From Lean to Agile… and back again: my journey to become part of Setapp’s team

After more than 13 years spent working for the automotive, wood industry and Internet of Things businesses, where I was running and coordinating projects, designing whole production systems and helping develop some of the breakthrough, environment-saving technologies, I thought it was a good time to make a change and search for new opportunities to grow.

I drew my inspiration for a change from my colleagues - software developers and Product Owner - I had pleasure to work with while working on the IOT product. I decided to learn coding with Java, and Agile with Scrum. It didn’t take long before I got Professional Scrum Master I Certification and then my first job as a Software Engineer Trainee. 

Soon I came to realize that I can contribute to the world more with my experience in creating, improving and managing processes, and working with people to provide them the best working conditions to help them achieve their best performance.

Agile is the new Lean

Throughout my professional career I believed that great results can be achieved in a sustainable way, where people can reach their best levels of performance in a thriving, supporting and psychologically safe environment. In the environment where motivated people can improve and shape the way they work.

Both, Lean and Agile, which are close to my heart support this approach. 

New challenges

When I saw the Scrum Master job offer at Setapp I was ready to take on new challenges. And as I knew some people from Setapp already and they made a good impression on me, I decided to apply. 

The whole recruitment process took place online, as it was the early stage of the COVID-19 outbreak. The sign of new times! There were 2 stages: an interview with the HR representative and the technical part with soon-to-be my-fellow-Scrum-Masters.

From the very beginning of the process I could feel a respectful and warm approach from the recruiter, who oversaw the whole process. And I must admit that when she called with good news it was the nicest “Welcome on board” conversation I have ever had.

Challenge means an opportunity to grow

The new environment is great. Important, international product with a positive impact on the environment, global players as partners, committed teams, many challenges that offer opportunities to bring my Lean - Agile mindset to action, sharing knowledge and experience, growing and learning new things. What more could you wish for?

Not only work

I love the fact that at Setapp, if you want to, you get a chance to truly shape the organization. If you'd like to get involved as one of the “consigliere” to the COO, you can join the Savage Horde team to help solve organization-level challenges. Would you like to develop bottom-up initiatives that make Setapp an even nicer and more pleasant place to work? You can join and support the Community TeamOr you can do both, given you have enough time and creativity for that!

So if you are looking for a place that offers opportunities to challenge yourself and grow, where it is more than just regular, dull work, then Setapp is the right place for you!

Are you looking for a new challenge?
Take a look at our open positions and join us!

10 June 2019Comments are off for this post.

How to do code reviews and keep good relationships with co-workers?

Code Review is one of the most important steps in the process of creating clear and high quality software. What do you define as your goal when, as a software developer, you start to verify the code written by other team members? Is it bug hunting? Maybe quality control? Or perhaps learning? Have you ever thought about code review as one of the communication channels and possible ways to build relationships in your work team?

During my conversations with other programmers, especially those who are just starting their programming career, I often hear them talking about stress related to code review. For them, code review is seen as a critique which looks for mistakes in their work. Of course they see the value behind the verification of their code by the people who are not its authors. They also realize that this is a chance for them to learn and improve their qualifications.

At the same time, the code review reminds them of school exams and assessment by other people. These situations are accompanied by the thought that it's not only the code, but also their professional judgment that is being evaluated.

Humanity in code review

Let's be honest - code review is a type of feedback and evaluation. Exactly like in any other type of communication, we have the sender and the receiver. We provide information and we expect some effects. But the effect can not just be well-written code, but also a well-coordinated team satisfied with their work.

How to achieve it? There are 5 simple steps:

Do not talk to the author

When you are directing a message to the author, it becomes more personal. You stop evaluating only the code. You’re starting to judge the person. You point out their mistakes, which they may perceive as undermining their competence. Please note that when you write "typo" it sounds less friendly than writing "person => person". It is better to write "maybe we can change the name of this function" than "change the name of this function".

As I mentioned earlier, one of the main concerns of people asking for a code review is precisely that they are the object of evaluation. And you do this when you are directing a message to the second-person singular - you are talking about the person, not about the code.

Instead of ordering, suggest and request

This is a great way to show your respect to the author of the code. Then you do not assume that your way is better than theirs or their approach is wrong. When your message looks more like a suggestion or question it sounds more tactful, and you and the recipient are then equal partners of the conversation.

"Rename this function" sounds like an order. You become a supervisor, not a partner. You also suggest that the author did something wrong and it is obvious, with no opportunity for any discussion. By changing this comment to the form of the question: "Could we change the name of this function?", you give the author space to answer and justify their choice.

Also, notice that by giving someone an order you take away their autonomy and the authorship of their code. It's not their choice anymore, it's yours. If the author had a reason to write the code in a certain way and would like to defend it, then the conversation may take the form of an argument,

For example, "I do not want to change the name of this function, because it complies with our convention." We will reply to the form of the question "I used this name because in my opinion it complies with our convention. Can you justify your suggestion? "

Give a reason

When you are suggesting a change, also add justification for your proposal. Why should we change anything? Of course, this is not about things like a typo or a missing comma. But if you propose a change in the approach or the solution, please also write why you think it will be better. Is it related to optimization or an accepted convention?

You can also provide links to some articles or documentation. Show that your suggestion is not only your personal opinion. Maybe the author does not know something, maybe he did not take something into account.

Come, call, talk

If you do not understand  or if you have doubts or you suggest a very big change, you don’t have to limit yourself to a comment. If the author is sitting nearby, go to them. If there is a bigger distance between you - call. During a verbal conversation it's easier to explain everything and have a proper conversation. You will have greater confidence that you understand each other and achieve the expected code review effect.

Praise

Have you ever praised anyone during code review? If not, it's really worth trying. For the interns or juniors it would be nice to write at least that their code is getting better and better. You can praise them for an interesting solution or code readability. Think about how you would feel if another team member praised your work. Wouldn’t it be nice to know that you are doing something right?

Our culture is more focused on looking for things to improve. That's why you rarely hear the words of appreciation. And these words are really valuable for teamwork. Hearing words of appreciation for their own efforts can make people feel valuable members of the group, which builds their motivation and loyalty. Believe me - praise is not something difficult or which requires a lot of effort. However, its effects can be amazing.

Recap

Sometimes simple changes can bring  great results. Look at the code review not only as a method to look for errors, but also as another channel of communication with other team members. As with any communication method  our information is essential - it's obvious. But also the manner in which we provide information is very important. It is necessary for effective work and achieving great goals.

Your project deserves significant code
Check what we can do for you!

6 June 2019Comments are off for this post.

At Setapp we bring more to work than we think

Setapp is all about including everyone’s voice and talents. We are a diverse team, and we cherish our differences by creating an inclusive workplace. As we are proud of our team members, we would like to share their passions with you!

Meet Rafał – one of our software developers. At Setapp, Rafał does the front-end, back-end and infrastructure of the apps. Apart from that, he also gets involved with regular activities linked to our projects, which are always done as a team. For example, estimating the resources, analysing the requirements and conducting research to ensure that we find the most suitable solution for our clients' needs.

Before we start to talk about your passion – climbing – tell us why you decided to become a software developer?

Mainly because it gives me great satisfaction as I solve real problems. And the problems in this industry are never-ending, and often need to be solved with creative thinking. That’s why every day at this job is unique and absolutely fascinating!

Your hobby – climbing – is also very unique! How did you get into it? Did someone inspire you?

I was convinced by my girlfriend to go on my first climbing session. She is a more experienced climber, and she also has a climbing blog. I thought it was quite interesting – that’s why I decided to give it a go. I tried it, I liked it, and I wanted more!

When did that happen?

About a year ago.

Tell us a little bit more about your first climbing experience!

My first professional climbing experience was at a climbing course in Spain. Ironically, it turned out that I have a slight fear of heights, so the first climb up to around 30 meters was a real mental challenge for me!

rafał_1

In the beginning, our instructor took care of us. The path was quite simple, but climbing that high was a new, extreme experience. The following climbs were also quite stressful, yet the views of Spanish coast after successfully getting to the top of the rock, and the feeling of achieving the goal were the reasons I wanted more and more!

What do you consider your biggest success in your climbing adventure so far?

Definitely going beyond my own limits.

And the biggest failure?

When it comes to climbing, I try to not look at anything as a failure.

What do you like most about climbing?

The Adrenalin boost, overcoming my own limits and, obviously, climbing awesome rocks!

Is this the kind of sport you do by yourself, or you do it with other people?

It depends on the type of climbing. To climb some smaller rocks (bouldering), you don’t need anyone to help you. You can do it by yourself, especially on an artificial climbing wall. To climb with a rope, you need at least two people – a climber and a belayer (a person that safeguards the climber).

rafał_2

Usually, people go climbing in a group so that the time at the rockface is much more fun. Personally, I usually go with 2-3 people. As for the artificial climbing wall, I like to climb by myself from time to time.

How does your passion look on a daily basis?

I try to climb 3-4 times a week. Once a week I go for climbing training. At the moment, I am spending a lot of time in the Czech Republic as there are quite a lot of good rocks there. We go there with my girlfriend when we have some free time and the weather is good. We also go for longer climbing trips – so far I’ve done that twice in Spain.

How do you stay in shape?

By training! Before that, I was regularly hitting the gym. Recently, I have been trying to move towards a specific climbing training plan. I climb on an artificial climbing wall a lot. I’m also doing yoga, mainly to stretch the muscles and regenerate quicker.

Is climbing something that you have to do regularly or you can take some longer breaks from it?

I don’t have so much experience, but I think climbing requires quite a complex set of skills and it takes a lot of practice to do it properly. But if you treat it as a fun recreational activity, it doesn’t require huge engagement. I have friends that go to a climbing wall recreationally and they also have a lot of fun!

How about equipment? What do you need to start your climbing journey?

It depends on the type of climbing. As a bare minimum, you need climbing shoes and a bag for chalk. For sports climbing, you need a harness, your personal kit and someone else at the ground with the rest of the team’s equipment. If you want the full equipment, you also need rope and quickdraws. Dynamic rope is the most significant cost of them all.

And to sum it all up – do you have any tips for someone who wants to start climbing?

I think it’s best to go for a free taster course for beginners at a climbing wall to check if it’s something that works for you. If you want to start climbing on rocks, it’s good to sign up to a climbing course. In this way, you can make sure that you do everything correctly with someone experienced as your coach.

Do you want to climb the career ladder with us?
Join Setapp and accomplish your career goals!

OUR OFFICE

Wojskowa 6, 60-792 Poznań, Poland
+48 506 798 998
office@setapp.pl

OUR OFFICES

POL: Wojskowa 6, 60-792 Poznań, Poland
+48 506 798 998
office@setapp.pl

ISR: 220 Hertzel Street, 7630003 Israel

COMPANY DATA

Setapp Sp. z o.o.
VAT ID: PL7781465185
REGON: 301183743
KRS: 0000334616

PRIVACY POLICY

OUR OFFICES

PL: Wojskowa 6, 60-792 Poznań, Poland
+48 506 798 998
office@setapp.pl

ISR: 220 Hertzel Street, 7630003 Israel

COMPANY DATA

Setapp Sp. z o.o.

VAT ID: PL7781465185
REGON: 301183743
KRS: 0000334616

PRIVACY POLICY

OUR OFFICE

Wojskowa 6, 60-792 Poznań, Poland
+48 506 798 998
office@setapp.pl

COMPANY DATA

Setapp Sp. z o.o.

VAT ID: PL7781465185
REGON: 301183743
KRS: 0000334616

PRIVACY POLICY

 COMPANY DATA

Setapp Sp. z o.o.
VAT ID: PL7781465185
REGON: 301183743
KRS: 0000334616

PRIVACY POLICY

OUR OFFICES

POL: Wojskowa 6, 60-792 Poznań, Poland
+48 506 798 998
office@setapp.pl

ISR: 220 Hertzel Street, 7630003 Israel

COMPANY DATA

Setapp Sp. z o.o.
VAT ID: PL7781465185
REGON: 301183743
KRS: 0000334616

PRIVACY POLICY

OUR OFFICES

PL: Wojskowa 6, 60-792 Poznań, Poland
+48 506 798 998
office@setapp.pl

ISR: 220 Hertzel Street, 7630003 Israel

COMPANY DATA

Setapp Sp. z o.o.

VAT ID: PL7781465185
REGON: 301183743
KRS: 0000334616

PRIVACY POLICY

OUR OFFICE

Wojskowa 6, 60-792 Poznań, Poland
+48 506 798 998
office@setapp.pl

COMPANY DATA

Setapp Sp. z o.o.

VAT ID: PL7781465185
REGON: 301183743
KRS: 0000334616

PRIVACY POLICY

klacz
Clutch award badge
topdizajn
svg-image
svg-image
svg-image
svg-image
Instagram Icon
svg-image
svg-image
smart-growth
european-union

©2020 Setapp. All rights reserved.